Tag Archives: Morocco Photography

Volubilis

Partly excavated and 100% historic. The Roman city of Volubilis is a superb area to photograph. The 99 acre site was built in the 3rd century BC and is located near Meknes, Morocco. Today it looks similar to what it would have after French colonial excavation.

What is amazing about Volubilis is that it feels so authentic. Part of this is the almost total lack of tourists. The beautiful mosaics on the ground sit undisturbed. When only part of a city is left standing, it is up to the observer to re-create the missing pieces. Only when something is removed…can we fill in the gaps with our own creation.

Variegated Azemmour

Azemmour is a quiet town located about 50 miles southwest of Casablanca on the Oum Er-Riba River. The medina inside the old Portuguese fort is worthy of a look. Void of touts and hagglers, this medina is used strictly for living. The colors are vibrant and the kids greet you with a simple “Bonjour.” A very relaxing place to grab  a few captures and finish the day with a coffee or Moroccan mint tea.

Alleys in Essaouira

Cities are made by alleys,

Alleys are made by cities.

Streets and boulevards are planned,

Alleys are spontaneous.

When we take a look,

An alley never portrays the same to us.

Essential Essaouira

One of the windiest cities in Africa sits on the Atlantic coast. Essaouira is a beautiful fortified town that has enough untaken photographs to fill a portfolio.

The smell of fresh, filleted fish linger in the narrow, damp, alleys. Spices, paintings and traditional Moroccan items are for sale as owners yell out their prices. The artsy feel reminds a bit of Ubud, Bali on certain levels.

Jimmy Hendrix stayed in Essaouira for a few days in July of 1969. However, local legend has it that his famous song, “Castles Made of Sand” was inspired by the beach castle ruins (pictured above) in Essaouira but he wrote the song two years prior.

Hassan II

In 1980, King Hassan II noted the following during his birthday celebration.

“I wish Casablanca to be endowed with a large, fine building of which it can be proud until the end of time… I want to build this mosque on the water, because God’s throne is on the water. Therefore, the faithful who go there to pray, to praise the creator on firm soil, can contemplate God’s sky and ocean”

I shot these with a Tokina 12-24 Wide Angle lens.

Images from El Jadida

It was known as Mazagão. From 1502 to 1769 the Portuguese controlled the area and built a beautiful fortification. Drawing on advancements in design and thought from the Renaissance, the Portuguese left behind an amazing structure that currently is identified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Continue reading

Doors of El Jadida

When I walk by an old door and it’s open, it whispers, “Hello, come on in.”

When I walk by an old door and it’s closed, I know its history is tried and true.

When I walk by an old door and it’s closed, it whispers, “Traveler, who are you?”